5.925-6.425 GHz band

So I noticed there’s a new channel available, im guessing pertaining to this:

Is there something special we need to do to use the 5.925-6.425 GHz band? I tried changing our radio to 6000 on an 80Mhz channel and it kicked all of our clients off and they never came back.

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What firmware are you running? I have a couple posts about this from earlier this year.

An A5 shipped to the US would be in violation of its Equipment Acceptance if it were capable of transmitting above 5.850 GHz! It is approved as a Part 15E (U-NII) device and such devices must be locked to US U-NII frequencies, and not allow country codes to be changed. If a release allows this, it is a bug that must be fixed, and users must not go above 5850 as they would be in serious violation of the rules.

The 5.925-7.125 GHz band is available under Part 101 for licensed, coordinated point to point use. There is an open FCC docket about allowing unlicensed use too, but it is only an open rulemaking proceeding. No Order has been issued yet. And in order to use outdoor equipment, the NPRM makes it clear that such use will require regular (how often is one of the open questions) checking in with an Automatic Frequency Coordination (AFC) database. That way, the unlicensed device will be kept off of frequencies that could interfere with licensed users. And remember, Part 101 stuff is long range FDD, so you will not hear anything on the frequencies you have to protect, since those are the receivers, and the transmitter is probably >10 miles away. Licensed Part 101 radios need a 33 or 38 dB dish, depending on whether the band is considered congested where they are.

So once that rule goes ahead, equipment will have to be modified to take advantage of it, and meet whatever its requirements are. And that will no doubt include subscribing to an AFC service before venturing above 5850. Sort of like TVWS. You won’t just be able to pick any frequency.

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